All the single ladies

Back at the end of April when we brought our pregnant reindeer into our mountain enclosure for calving there was a herd of around 30 reindeer who either were very old, weren’t in calf or too young to calve so there was no need to keep them in so back out onto the free range they went.

Malawi and Addax on the 26th of April. Both cows are now retired from breeding at the ages of 17 and 14 years old respectively and so will now free-range for the vast majority of their retirement.

Over the past few months we have caught up with them on a number of occasions to check on them. Their antler growth is way ahead of the cows who came in for calving as they didn’t have the same demand on their bodies to look after a youngster so they were looking fantastic. Also as they weren’t pregnant and no calf to look after when we did see them from a distance all we’d have to do is call into the distance our special and unique reindeer call and they would come running! There is plenty of grazing out there but they acted like they were starving.

Ryvita on the 18th of May growing wonderful antlers, now 14 years old and retired from breeding.
Fly on the 18th of May. Now 15 Fly is also in her retirement and is growing beautiful big antlers.

In this group are old girls Malawi (17 years old), Dixie, Lulu and Enya (16 years old) and Fly and Fern (15 years old). But, you’d never know they were as old as the hills because they are looking fantastic. Some of the youngsters in this group are Fez and Trilby (1 year old) and the ever famous Holy Moley as well as others her age Flax, Borlotti, Mangetout, Lima, Turtle, Sunflower, Mushy and Pumpkin (all 2 years old). Some days we’d go out to give them a feed and they’d be hanging out around the building works going on up at the Cairngorm funicular. But with a bit of careful herding around tracks and roads they weaved their way through the building site.

Amy checking in with the “single ladies” on the 8th of May.
All the “single ladies” on Cairngorm Mountain at the end of May. Very keen for a free meal!
Pumpkin on the 26th April . Pumpkin is only 2 years old and not one of our breeding girls just yet so she remained free-ranging all Spring.
Holy Moley on the 18th of May. The TV star is also now 2 years old and her one antler is growing well. It’s hard to believe but next year she could become a mother, but she’s got one more year of freedom ahead of her to enjoy first!

One of the days we went out to feed them we had some ex-herders from over ten years ago visiting. We headed out into the northern corries, gave them a call and the herd came running. It was lovely to see the ex-herders interact with the reindeer they knew so well once upon a time. And even where they didn’t necessarily recognise most of them because they were too young one ex-herder turned to me and asked if Diamond (10 year old female) was related to Lilibet who she knew well in the time she worked here. And the answer was yes, she was related. So it just shows that there is a strong family resemblance even a few generations in.

Diamond, a non-breeding 10 year old cow, on the free range on the 18th May – a relative of Lilibet.
Our herd of non-breeding cows on the 27th of June. Fly closest to the camera.

We’re looking forward to catching up with them again soon. Seeing these old reindeer doing so well in the Cairngorms just really shows how this mountain environment really is home to them.

Fiona

Yawning Reindeer

I can’t help but smile when I see a reindeer yawn. They have the most wonderful facial expressions, produce the best sounds, and have the wobbliest of chins. I always try to capture the moment on camera but I’m usually way too slow and miss the moment. Over the past year I’ve been compiling a folder of my best reindeer yawns ready to produce a blog one day. Despite reindeer herding being my full time job, at the rate I’m going it would probably take several years before I’ve captured a decent amount of silly pictures and videos.

Sooo… I mentioned my blog idea to Hen and Andi recently whist *working very hard* in the office. Of course, they came to my rescue and more or less instantly produced many glorious pictures of yawning reindeer to bolster my collection.

So here goes, in no order or for any great reason other than hopefully making people smile. Enjoy!

Check out the chin wobble on Dr Seuss! Video by Andi – October 2021.
Magnus – March 2017.
Christie – December 2021.
Holy Moley finding fame tiring – March 2022.
Ibex – March 2022.
Kiruna – yawning or perhaps laughing at a good joke?! Summer 2021.
Sambar – September 2019.
Hamish yawning on the job! Christmas training – September 2013.
Stripping your velvet is clearly a tiring business for Scolty – September 2017.
Sholto – looking very majestic mid yawn! September 2011.
Kipling on the free-range – August 2018.
Merida – August 2018.
Camembert – free-ranging April 2022
Malawi – the oldest reindeer currently in the herd, aged 16, definitely deserves a yawny snooze in the spring sunshine – April 2022.
Moulting is very tiring for Celt – June 2021.

Ruth

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